Tagged: short films

Our view stats on Vimeo during our busiest week to-date

Thousands of eyes on us

Our sci-fi short film NEW debuted online November 2, and the response has been very gratifying indeed. As I write this post, we’re coming up on our 15,000th view. For a three-day period in early November, we were clocking around 3000 views per day! Those might not be spectacular numbers for, say, a 30-second kitten video, but for a quiet, 17-minute drama it’s pretty damn great. Even better: the smart comments the film has received. More about that in a moment.

Vidsee postThe film has been featured at sites like Film Shortage and Alltop. And I particularly enjoyed the generous selection of screen caps and long, English-as-a-second-language plot summary over at Singaporean short film site VidSee. Fun… but don’t read it if you haven’t seen the film yet!

Last week, I did an interview for a TV station in Switzerland called BeCurious TV – they’ll be airing that interview soon, along with NEW and two of my other shorts.

Best of all, we’ve been covered at io9.com, the go-to site for all things science fiction. I’ve been trying to get them to write about NEW for over two years! They were my white whale. Back when we were crowdfunding the budget, I sent the editors emails brimming over with all the charm I could muster, detailing the sci-fi epic being cooked up in their very own backyard (the site is based in San Francisco). All to no response… until now. Fair enough. I imagine they wanted to have a finished film to show people before writing about us.

But write abOur review at io9out us they did, last month, with a nice review that declared NEW “pretty heartbreaking.” When their story was published, it shot our view count through the roof for a couple of days. A month later it’s still a major driver of traffic to the film. Thank you, io9.

Click the image to read the review, and then take the time to savor the hardcore sci-fi discussions happening in the comments. You can see the viewers digging in, debating story points and extrapolating on the future glimpsed in NEW. No one is discussing whether the film is any good or not – that bar has been met for them. Following what was a just-okay festival run, it’s immensely satisfying for me to see NEW really finding its audience like this.
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This makes me happy

Frame grab from The 1K Project II

Click the image to watch The 1K Project II

Sometimes I dream I’m driving in a no-consequences world, one with cartoon physics. Invariably I spin out, or flip my car into a ditch, or off a cliff. Always I emerge unscathed. It’s then a simple matter to grip my vehicle with two hands and place it back on the road, righting it as if it weighed no more than a styrofoam cooler.

Maybe that’s the reason I respond so strongly to The 1K Project II, because it seems to operate in this same no-impact universe. Or maybe it’s just because it’s so fucking cool. I’m not the only one who feels this way: the video racked up millions of views on the gamer site gametrailers.com. Over the past few years I’ve shared links to it on MySpace, later Facebook, and then Twitter. And now, I have a blog. So here it comes again.

“The 1K Project by French machinima creator BlackShark marks a particularly virtuosic display of procedural media’s capacity for replay and repetition. To make the 1K Project II, Blackshark used the driving game TrackMania to capture 1,000 replays of the game, each with subtle variations in trajectory and outcome, which were recorded and then played back layered together to create a frenzy of automotive mayhem.” –credit: criticalcommons.org

Some crackerjack editing plus a perfect choice of music track make the thing sing. The result is a sublime work that by rights should be looping in somebody’s MOMA somewhere. In my opinion, at least. Enjoy.